The Commonwealth Bank lost 10 years of banking records

As reported on BuzzFeed, the Commonwealth Bank of Australia lost backup tapes holding ten years (2004-2014) of banking records for up to 12 million customers. If you’re a customer of the Commonwealth Bank, and haven’t already been turned off by the stories coming out of the Royal Commission, then you should take this as the last straw and change banks. Make sure you tell them why.

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Blog-A-Day May

It has been literally years since I’ve blogged on anything resembling a regular basis. This hit me recently when I renewed my WordPress subscription, and then again today when I renewed my DNS domain. I’m just not blogging enough – even for myself, and I’m the primary audience. So – I’m going to post every day in May. A #BlogADayMay.

As usual, I’m blogging for myself. If other people find my rambling ruminations regarding reality interesting, or even of benefit, that’s great, but it’s a bonus, not the goal. The topics for this month will be wide and varied. Posts will range from short to long, because I don’t have an internal editor, and will write until I run out of things to say or time to say it in. Once May is over, I may continue, or I may go back to my irregular posting.

You have been warned.

Should repository managers ever ‘unpublish’?

As a result of the recent kerfuffle about left-pad being unpublished from the NPM repository, and the subsequent “internet breakage”, I had a twitter discussion with Charles Miller about the right for unpublish to even be an option.

First, let me make something clear: having provided an unpublish option, npmjs.com was ethically, if not legally1, obliged to respect Azer Kuçulo’s decision to unpublish. The fact that this caused downstream problems doesn’t change that. But what this post is about is:

Should the unpublish option have been available?

And yes, I think it should be.

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ExtJS 5 and Gradle – Playing Together

Augmenting ExtJS with Gradle

ExtJS is pretty nice, overall, and it comes with a powerful build tool – Sencha Cmd.

Running builds with it can be tedious, because it doesn’t have any up-to-date checks – it constantly rebuilds stuff it doesn’t need. Oh, the time wasting!

As it turns out, Sencha Cmd is an Ant-based build tool. Which means we can create Gradle builds that augment it – given us support for such things as up-to-date checks.

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